Emotionally supportive relationships linked to lower testosterone

Author: Michael O. Garvey


Science and folklore alike have long suggested that high levels of testosterone can facilitate the sorts of attitudes and behavior that make for, well, a less than ideal male parent.

It has long been known that among humans (and some other species as well), males who cooperate amicably with their female mates in raising and nurturing offspring often have lower testosterone levels than their more aggressive and occasionally grumpy counterparts. But two University of Notre Dame anthropologists are looking beyond the nuclear family for such effects.

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Rahul Oka: Advocating for Refugees in Kenya

Author: Carol Bradley

Rahul Oka

Anthropologist Rahul Oka has been working with UNHCR and the World Bank on a new refugee camp being built, helping create a template for refugee resettlement. “All the data we’ve collected, both qualitative and quantitative, will inform the new camp. My job is not to tell them that they need a paradigm shift," he said. "My job is to make sure that any development project in which I am involved is informed by on-the-ground analysis and is based on observed reality of local events and behaviors.”

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Researchers propose 'breastsleeping' as a new word and concept

Author: William G. Gilroy


As far as titles in academic journals go, it’s quite the attention-getter. “There is no such thing as infant sleep, there is no such thing as breastfeeding, there is only breastsleeping,” reads the title of a new peer-reviewed commentary piece by University of Notre Dame anthropologists James McKenna and Lee Gettler that appears in the prestigious European journal Acta Paediatrica.

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Anthropologists Agustín Fuentes and Devi Snively on ‘Bride of Frankie’

Author: Carol C. Bradley

Behind Snively and Fuentes, Victor Stein (Circus-Szalewski) and Frances Mary “Frankie” Stein (Rachel Sledd) pose for wedding photos

Agustin Fuentes is chair of the Department of Anthropology and a widely known anthropologist specializing in primatology and human evolution. This fall, Devi Snively, an adjunct faculty member in Anthropology, will be teaching her popular course “Cultures of Fear: Anthropological Perspectives on Horror Films.”

During the summer, they have another gig — he’s an independent film producer working with director, screenwriter and partner Snively on short horror comedies including “Confederate Zombie Massacre,” “Teenage Bikini Vampire” and, this summer, “Bride of Frankie” — a “feminist take on the Frankenstein story with a ‘Taming of the Shrew’ subplot,” says Snively.

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Interdisciplinary Project to Study Human Distinctiveness, Evolution of Wisdom

Author: Carrie Gates

Agustin Fuentes icon

With a $1.8 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation, Agustín Fuentes will co-direct the Human Distinctiveness Project, seeking to advance research at the intersection of theology and evolutionary anthropology. The three-year project will support training for theologians in evolutionary and archaeological anthropology, as well as research on the evolution of wisdom.

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Ph.D. Program Establishes Strong Reputation in First Year

Author: Josh Weinhold

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Under the leadership of Ian Kuijt, director of graduate studies, seven first-year Ph.D. students encountered a curriculum focused on integrative anthropology—studying approaches and methods across a range of subfields. Next year, the program will add six students, who chose Notre Dame over several other elite institutions.

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Anthropology Majors Thrive in Diverse Fields After Graduation

Author: Daniel Sehlhorst and Carrie Gates

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Conducting research in marine biology. Pursuing a graduate degree in global health. Promoting education in order to fight poverty in Uganda. Anthropology majors in Notre Dame’s College of Arts and Letters undertake a rigorous curriculum that gets them ready for myriad opportunities after graduation—whether they enter the workforce immediately, enroll in graduate school, or choose an elite public service program.

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Medical Anthropologist Natalie Porter to Join Faculty

Author: Josh Weinhold

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Medical anthropologist Natalie Porter will join Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology as an assistant professor in fall 2015. As a researcher studying health and biosafety issues associated with human-animal interactions and laboratory experiments, Porter will bring a “distinctive and engaging” scholarly presence, said Professor Agustín Fuentes, chair of the department.

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