Tracie Canada

Postdoctoral Research Associate

B.A., Duke University, 2013
M.A., University of Virginia, 2016
Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2020

Tracie Canada

Dr. Tracie Canada is a socio-cultural anthropologist with research and teaching interests in race, sport, kinship, and the performing body. In her postdoctoral position, she will work on her first book project, tentatively titled Tackling the Everyday: Race, Family, and Nation in Big-Time College Football, which moves off the gridiron into the daily lives of the young Black athletes that sustain this American sport. Informed by more than a year of ethnographic research at universities in the southeastern United States, this work argues that Black football players are able to navigate institutional systems and everyday lived spaces that order, discipline, and regulate them because of their meaningful mobilization of certain kinship relationships.

In her current and future projects, she aims to highlight what football, and the lived experiences of its Black players, can tell us about racial, historical, political, and power dynamics in the contemporary United States. She is particularly interested in the performing body in order to reveal how social hierarchies and inequalities manifest in embodied practice and how processes of violence and care are both impactful.

Dr. Canada’s research has been supported by various agencies, including the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association. In addition to her research and teaching, she is involved with a number of programs committed to mentoring high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented backgrounds, including the Mellon Mays Gap Assistance Program, the Leadership Alliance Mellon Initiative, and the Provost’s Summer Mentorship Program. 

She will join Notre Dame’s Department of Anthropology faculty as an Assistant Professor in fall 2021.

Curriculum Vitae

Contact: tcanada@nd.edu
292 Corbett Family Hall