Stories

In Mexico, Notre Dame medical anthropologist studies how and why some doctors foster a culture that discriminates against female patients 

Author: Brian Wallheimer

As a medical anthropologist, Notre Dame associate professor Vania Smith-Oka is interested in how larger institutions shape the lives of the people who interact within them. In her current research, she wants to know how some medical professionals, tasked with caring for patients, create a system that abuses some of their most vulnerable patients. She and graduate students are spending time in hospitals and doctor’s offices in Mexico to understand how such a culture evolves.

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New book explores generational preconceptions in post-war Sierra Leone

Author: Hannah Heinzekehr

In Catherine Bolten’s recently published book, "Serious Youth in Sierra Leone," she presents findings on generational preconceptions and their impact on young men in Makeni, Sierra Leone. Her research has implications for everything from development to post-conflict reconstruction to how millennials are perceived and engaged around the world.

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Cool Classes: Martial Arts and Popular Culture

Author: Nicole White '19

Bare feet slapped on the hardwood floor and students watched their reflections in the mirrored walls as Lindsay McCray ’20 commanded the attention of Rockne Memorial Gymnasium’s Room 109. 

 

Fitted in a spotless white suit, black belt tied tight around her waist, McCray was there in her role as president of the Notre Dame Mixed Martial Arts Club. The students before her were there on a field trip. Their class? Martial Arts and Popular Culture.…

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Anthropologist’s exploration of migration, music, and poetics wins trio of book awards

Author: Brian Wallheimer

Notre Dame anthropologist Alex Chávez’s first book, Sounds of Crossing: Music, Migration, and the Aural Poetics of Huapango Arribeño, has certainly caught the eye of his peers. The in-depth look at Mexican migrants’ cultural expression through music has earned three prestigious awards in the fields of anthropology and ethnomusicology.​​​​​​Chávez’s work has earned the 2018 Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology Book Prize and 2018 Association for Latina and Latino Anthropologists Book Award, and now the Alan P. Merriam Prize from the Society for Ethnomusicology. 

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Anthropologist's study shows fathers’ postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Author: Colleen Sharkey

In a first-of-its-kind study, Notre Dame anthropologist Lee Gettler and psychologist Patty Kuo focused on how dads’ biology around the birth of their children relates to their parenting down the road. Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth – either skin to skin or clothed – were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.

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